2016. Holtz FG et al. – Determinants of visual acuity outcomes in eyes with neovascular AMD treated with anti-VEGF agents: An instrumental variable analysis of the AURA study

 

Holz FG, Tadayoni R, Beatty S, Berger AR, Cereda MG, Hykin P, Staurenghi G, Wittrup-Jensen K, Nilsson J, Kim K, Sivaprasad S. Determinants of visual acuity outcomes in eyes with neovascular AMD treated with anti-VEGF agents: An instrumental variable analysis of the AURA study. Eye (Lond). 2016;30(8):1063-71

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27197868

Read full article

Abstract

Purpose. To identify the strongest variable(s) linked with the number of ranibizumab injections and outcomes in AURA, and to identify ways to improve outcomes using this association.

Methods. AURA was a large observational study that monitored visual acuity over a 2-year period in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) who received ranibizumab injections. Baseline characteristics, resource use, and outcomes were analyzed using an instrumental variable approach and regression analysis.

Results. Data were analyzed from 2227 patients enrolled in AURA. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and ophthalmoscopy were the most common diagnostic tests used, and this combination was the strongest instrumental variable. Use of OCT and ophthalmoscopy affected the number of injections given and resulted in an increase in visual acuity gains from baseline of 17.6 letters in year 1 and 2.5 letters in year 2. Regression models using the instrumental variable (OCT and ophthalmoscopy combined) showed that ≥5.1 (95% CI: 3.3-11.4) ranibizumab injections were needed to maintain visual acuity from baseline to year 1 and ≥8.3 (95% CI: 5.3-18.8) injections were needed to maintain visual acuity from year 1 to year 2. To gain ≥15 letters, ≥7.9 (95% CI: 5.1-17.5) ranibizumab injections would be needed in year 1 and ≥16.1 (95% CI: 10.3-36.4) injections would be needed over 2 years.

Conclusions. These findings highlight the role that regular monitoring plays in guiding neovascular AMD therapy and they showed that the number of ranibizumab injections needed to maintain visual acuity is higher than that administered in AURA.